Travel Information

What To Wear…

In general, tourists should wear modest or conservative attire, especially in Zanzibar, which is a conservative Muslim society. Western women should not wear clothing that reveals too much skin. 'Kangas', brightly-colored wrap-around cloth, are affordable, available throughout the country, and can serve as a discreet covering.The Masai people, with their colorful clothing, are tempting targets for any tourist with a camera. However, they expect to be paid for it, and you should always ask before taking pictures.It is common practice among Swahili-speakers to use 'shikamoo' (prounounced 'she ka moe' and literally meaning, 'I hold your feet') when greeting elders or superiors. The usual response from an elder will be 'marahaba'. In Zanzibar, the equivalent of 'shikamoo' is 'chei chei'. The traveler will get along very well when using these verbal expressions of respect. In addition, a title after the 'shikamoo' is also a useful indicator that you are not just a dumb tourist -- 'shikamoo…

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Visas…

WHO NEEDS VISA TO TANZANIA? All nationals of the countries or territorial entities mentioned below. Stateless and those holding non-national travel/refugee documents or passports issued by an authority not recognized by the United Republic of Tanzania, must obtain a valid visa on each occasion they need to enter Tanzania. It advised that you contact your local visa agency for up-to-date information regarding entry visas. The countries whose nationals require visa for Tanzania are: Afghanistan; Albania; Algeria; Angola; Argentina; Armenia; Australia, Austria; Azerbaijan; Bahrain; Belarus; Belgium; Benin; Bhutan; Bolivia; Bosnia; Brazil; Bulgaria; Burkina Faso; Burma; Burundi; Cambodia; Canada; Cape Verde; Central African Republic; Chad; Chile; China (Peoples Republic of ); Colombia; Comoros; Congo; Congo (Democratic Republic of); Costa Rica; Cote D'Ivoire; Croatia; Cuba; Czech Republic; Denmark; Djibouti; Dominican Republic; Ecuador; Egypt; El-Salvador; Equatorial Guinea; Eritre…

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Security…

Tanzania is a freindly and generally safe country. However all travellers must exercise vigilance in both their belongings as well as their behaviour, so as not to attract undue attention. It is advised that all travellers visit their own Government or Embassy websites to obtain up-to-date advice on travelling to Tanzania.…

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Health…

Top Health and Travel Tips Get Travel Insurance for Tanzania & check that the cover is appropriate for all your Travel in Tanzania. Check what vaccinations you need at least 6 weeks before you go & consider whether you need to take extra health precautions. Get a good travel guidebook for Tanzania and get to know your destinations in Tanzania and local laws & customs of Tanzania. Ensure you have a valid passport and the necessary Visas for Tanzania. Make copies of your passport & any visa pages, insurance policy plus 24-hour emergency number & ticket details. Leave these copies, itinerary & contact details with family & friends.   Specific Health Issues: All travelers should visit either their personal physician or a travel health clinic 4-8 weeks before departure. Malaria:Â Prophylaxis with Lariam (mefloquine), Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil), or doxycycline is recommended for all areas at altitudes less than 1800 m. Vaccinations: Polio One-time…

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History…

This is probably one of the oldest known continuously inhabited areas on Earth; fossil remains of humans and pre-human hominids have been found dating back over two million years. More recently, Tanzania is believed to have been populated by hunter-gatherer communities, probably cushitic and Khoisan speaking people. About 2000 years ago, Bantu-speaking people began to arrive from western Africa in a series of migrations. Later, Nilotic pastoralists arrived, and continued to immigrate into the area through to the 18th century.Travellers and merchants from the Persian Gulf and Western India have visited the East African coast since early in the first millennium CE. Islam was practised on the Swahili coast as early as the eighth or ninth century CE.In the late 19th century, Imperial Germany conquered the regions that are now Tanzania (minus Zanzibar), Rwanda, and Burundi, and incorporated them into German East Africa. The post-World War I accords and the League of Nations charter designat…

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elewana collection - Lodges, Camps & Hotels in Harmony with Africa
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