Awards and Press

 

 

Amboseli National Park covers 392 sq kms, only a small portion of the surrounding 3000 sq km of the Amboseli ecosystem. Tortilis Camp is on the south western edge of the park, facing the mountain and is accessed from within the National Park. It overlooks its own private wildlife conservancy, Kitirua, 30,000 acres. Away from the busy eastern side of Amboseli, and with its own private conservancy, guests experience a wild and private

Amboseli.

The area is famous for the dramatic views of Kilimanjaro, the highest free standing mountain in the world, and the highest peak on the African continent. Kilimanjaro at 19,340ft or 5,894m rises dramatically out of the 4000ft (1,200m) Amboseli plains. An extinct volcano with two peaks, rocky Mwenzi and Kibo a crater rim. The glaciers on the mountain are slowly disappearing with global warming, but it remains snow capped as any precipitation on the mountain settles as snow. Despite being in Tanzania, the best views of the mountain are from Amboseli, with Tortilis Camp on a south-west hillside facing the mountain, having the most dramatic views of all.

Amboseli is also famous for its elephant herds, which have been followed and documented by world renowned researcher Cynthia Moss. Amboseli has some of the largest elephants in Africa, and the guides at Tortilis Camp know the individual elephants, their family history, and are able to get very close to the habituated herds.
Much of Amboseli incorporates the dried up bed of a Pleistocene lake, with lush deep fresh water springs in the middle of the park a haven for hippos and birdlife and a playground for elephants. As well as plentiful plains game and their predators, the area hosts its own eastern white bearded wildebeest migration, a population that is genetically separate from the Masai Mara/Serengeti population.

Climate

The days are warm, rising to maximum of 30 deg C, but comfortable with minimum humidity, and the evenings are cool with cosy blankets on the beds. Rainfall is mostly in November with an average of 220mm per year.

 

Community & Conservation

{slide=Community}

Tortilis employs around 60% of its staff from the local community, training them from scratch to become professional guides, barman and waiters. With each employed individual in Kenya supporting an average of 8 dependants, our 40 local staff members potentially support between 300 and 400 members of the community.

Walking safaris with local Maasai guides are encouraged at Tortilis so that guests have the oppotunity to find out, first hand, about the intricacies of Maasai culture, stimulating a pride and desire among the community to preserve their traditions.

In 2010, Tortilis Camp donated KES 1,000,000 towards the building of Esiteti Primary School, which opened its doors with great ceremony in August 2011. Since the Cheli & Peacock Community Trust was launched in March 2011, Tortilis clients have donated nearly US$11,000 for sports equipment, books, stationary and construction work for Esiteti Primary School.

{slide=Conservation}

Without fences demarcating National Park boundaries, Kenya’s wildlife roam freely between protected areas and surrounding privately owned land where their security largely falls into the hands of the community. To promote wildlife protection and conservation among these communties, it is becoming increasingly recognised that they should receive tangible long term benefits from wildlife-based tourism.
In full partnership with the community, Tortilis Camp is one of two tourism operators paying fixed rent to local Maasai landowners to preserve the Kitirua Conservancy, a 30,000 acre wildlife corridor bridging Amboseli and Tanzania. In 2011 alone, Tortilis paid US$ 36,145 in fixed rent for the Conservancy, 70% of which was paid directly to the community, while the remaining 30% was allocated to funding conservancy management.

Conservancy fees of US$30 per person per day paid by most guests at Tortilis fund conservancy management, anti-poaching and wildlife protection within Kitirua Conservancy. To achieve our conservation goals, we are working in partnership with the Big Life Foundation, whose efforts are widespread across the 2 million acre Amboseli ecosystem and are crucial to securing a successful future for Amboseli’s wildlife.  We would like to encourage you to visit the Big Life Foundation website to find out more about their conservation efforts and additional operational funding requirements.
Prior to their involvement with Big Life, Tortilis supported the Amboseli Tsavo Game Scouts Association for many years, donating US$0.50 per person per night towards their community training and anti-poaching work. ATGSA recruits its Game Scouts from the local Maasai community, training them to provide wildlife security and conservation awareness within the vast Amboseli and Tsavo ecosystems.

If you would like to contribute further to the conservation of the greater Amboseli ecosystem by supporting Big Life’s efforts, you may make your donation via the Cheli & Peacock Community Trust. Contact us to find out how.

An African elephant is second only to man in changing its environment. During the 1970’s, poaching and drought encouraged elephants to seek refuge in unnatural numbers within the core of Amboseli National Park, devastating the woodlands.

Observing the rapid depletion of the elephant habitat, the internationally renowned African Conervation Centre, together with the Kenya Wildlife Service, have created fenced “elephant exclosures” to allow woodland wetlands to naturally rejuvinate in the absence of these immense mammals. In support of their efforts, Tortilis Camp rehabilitated and maintains the 2.2km squared Olengaiya Swamp elephant exclosure just 15 minutes from camp.

Get Involved

{slide=The Olengaiya Swamp Enclosure

 

 

Location and Wildlife

Amboseli National Park covers 392 sq kms, only a small portion of the surrounding 3000 sq km of the Amboseli ecosystem. Tortilis Camp is on the south western edge of the park, facing the mountain and is accessed from within the National Park. It overlooks its own private wildlife conservancy, Kitirua, 30,000 acres. Away from the busy eastern side of Amboseli, and with its own private conservancy, guests experience a wild and private

Amboseli.

The area is famous for the dramatic views of Kilimanjaro, the highest free standing mountain in the world, and the highest peak on the African continent. Kilimanjaro at 19,340ft or 5,894m rises dramatically out of the 4000ft (1,200m) Amboseli plains. An extinct volcano with two peaks, rocky Mwenzi and Kibo a crater rim. The glaciers on the mountain are slowly disappearing with global warming, but it remains snow capped as any precipitation on the mountain settles as snow. Despite being in Tanzania, the best views of the mountain are from Amboseli, with Tortilis Camp on a south-west hillside facing the mountain, having the most dramatic views of all.

Amboseli is also famous for its elephant herds, which have been followed and documented by world renowned researcher Cynthia Moss. Amboseli has some of the largest elephants in Africa, and the guides at Tortilis Camp know the individual elephants, their family history, and are able to get very close to the habituated herds.
Much of Amboseli incorporates the dried up bed of a Pleistocene lake, with lush deep fresh water springs in the middle of the park a haven for hippos and birdlife and a playground for elephants. As well as plentiful plains game and their predators, the area hosts its own eastern white bearded wildebeest migration, a population that is genetically separate from the Masai Mara/Serengeti population.

Climate

The days are warm, rising to maximum of 30 deg C, but comfortable with minimum humidity, and the evenings are cool with cosy blankets on the beds. Rainfall is mostly in November with an average of 220mm per year.

 

Safari Dining

With an invitingly lush and healthy vegetable garden, Tortilis Camp prides itself in serving up its fresh homegrown salads and vegetables with every meal. From lavish bush breakfast out in the middle of the plains, to fresh homemade pastas and breads at the camp, the Tortilis chefs excel themselves with every meal.

Tortilis Camp has a spacious dining room overlooking Mt Kilimanjaro, where guests eat at their own individual tables (i.e. not communally, like at some of the other camps). The camp has a daily set menu.
General mealtimes are as follows:

  • Breakfast 06.30-09.30
  • Lunch 13.00-14.30
  • Afternoon tea and homemade cakes and biscuits are served during the afternoon
  • Dinner 20.00 – 21.30
  • Canapes ‘bitings’ are served in the bar and lounge before dinner.

Tortilis Camp is happy to cater for special diets such as vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, etc. Please make sure your travel agent informs us well in advance though, so that the camp managers can prepare for your arrival.

 

Community & Conservation

{slide=Community}

Tortilis employs around 60% of its staff from the local community, training them from scratch to become professional guides, barman and waiters. With each employed individual in Kenya supporting an average of 8 dependants, our 40 local staff members potentially support between 300 and 400 members of the community.

Walking safaris with local Maasai guides are encouraged at Tortilis so that guests have the oppotunity to find out, first hand, about the intricacies of Maasai culture, stimulating a pride and desire among the community to preserve their traditions.

In 2010, Tortilis Camp donated KES 1,000,000 towards the building of Esiteti Primary School, which opened its doors with great ceremony in August 2011. Since the Cheli & Peacock Community Trust was launched in March 2011, Tortilis clients have donated nearly US$11,000 for sports equipment, books, stationary and construction work for Esiteti Primary School.

{slide=Conservation}

Without fences demarcating National Park boundaries, Kenya’s wildlife roam freely between protected areas and surrounding privately owned land where their security largely falls into the hands of the community. To promote wildlife protection and conservation among these communties, it is becoming increasingly recognised that they should receive tangible long term benefits from wildlife-based tourism.
In full partnership with the community, Tortilis Camp is one of two tourism operators paying fixed rent to local Maasai landowners to preserve the Kitirua Conservancy, a 30,000 acre wildlife corridor bridging Amboseli and Tanzania. In 2011 alone, Tortilis paid US$ 36,145 in fixed rent for the Conservancy, 70% of which was paid directly to the community, while the remaining 30% was allocated to funding conservancy management.

Conservancy fees of US$30 per person per day paid by most guests at Tortilis fund conservancy management, anti-poaching and wildlife protection within Kitirua Conservancy. To achieve our conservation goals, we are working in partnership with the Big Life Foundation, whose efforts are widespread across the 2 million acre Amboseli ecosystem and are crucial to securing a successful future for Amboseli’s wildlife.  We would like to encourage you to visit the Big Life Foundation website to find out more about their conservation efforts and additional operational funding requirements.
Prior to their involvement with Big Life, Tortilis supported the Amboseli Tsavo Game Scouts Association for many years, donating US$0.50 per person per night towards their community training and anti-poaching work. ATGSA recruits its Game Scouts from the local Maasai community, training them to provide wildlife security and conservation awareness within the vast Amboseli and Tsavo ecosystems.

If you would like to contribute further to the conservation of the greater Amboseli ecosystem by supporting Big Life’s efforts, you may make your donation via the Cheli & Peacock Community Trust. Contact us to find out how.

An African elephant is second only to man in changing its environment. During the 1970’s, poaching and drought encouraged elephants to seek refuge in unnatural numbers within the core of Amboseli National Park, devastating the woodlands.

Observing the rapid depletion of the elephant habitat, the internationally renowned African Conervation Centre, together with the Kenya Wildlife Service, have created fenced “elephant exclosures” to allow woodland wetlands to naturally rejuvinate in the absence of these immense mammals. In support of their efforts, Tortilis Camp rehabilitated and maintains the 2.2km squared Olengaiya Swamp elephant exclosure just 15 minutes from camp.

Get Involved

{slide=The Olengaiya Swamp Enclosure  

Accommodation

Tents

With Mt. Kilimanjaro peering down over the entire camp, each of Tortilis Camp’s 16 tents has a glorious view of the mountain.
Each makuti-covered tent consists of a main bedroom with twin or double beds, en-suite bathroom and a spacious verandah. Let us know if you require twin beds or double bed.
[All tents can fit one extra bed, for children under the age of 16 yrs only]

Family Tent

With outstanding views of Mt Kilimanjaro, enjoyed from the comfort of your own private family verandah, Tortilis Camp’s new Family Tent is another great addition to this child-friendly safari camp in Amboseli.
The Family Tent consists of one double en suite bedroom, one twin en suite bedroom, and a spacious private verandah. Featuring a brand new swimming pool shared with the Private House.
[Both bedrooms can fit one extra bed for children under the age of 16 years only]

Private House

With Mt. Kilimanjaro peering down over the entire camp, Tortilis Camp’s Private House has a glorious view of the mountain.
The Private House consists of one en-suite double bedroom, one en-suite twin bedroom, and a spacious sitting / dining room with verandah. Featuring a brand new swimming pool shared with the Family Tent.
[Both bedrooms can fit one extra bed, for children under the age of 16 yrs]